Major and Minor

The Celtic Studies Program is an undergraduate degree program housed by the Department of Scandinavian at the University of California, Berkeley. Its purpose is to bring together faculty and students with interests in the cultures, languages, literature, and history of the Celtic regions.

Faculty from the departments of English, Rhetoric, Linguistics, and History participate in teaching regular courses in Irish and Welsh language and literature (in all their historical phases), and in the history, mythology, and cultures of the Celtic world. Breton is also offered regularly, and Gaulish, Cornish, Manx, and Scots Gaelic are foreseen as occasional offerings, as are courses in the history and structure of the older Celtic languages. Students may complete an undergraduate major or minor in Celtic studies by fulfilling the requirements described below. The program has an innovative linkage of language and literature-in-translation courses intended to allow students maximum flexibility in pursuing their studies.

The Celtic Studies Program accepts entrants to its major from both freshmen and transfer students. Our major is not impacted and welcomes application from Celtic Studies enthusiasts.

The Major:

The major in Celtic Studies is designed to give students both a broad understanding of the place of Celtic languages and cultures in the world and a firm grounding in one or more of the Celtic languages. In addition to at least 4 semesters of language study and the other major requirements, students will be required to organize their studies with reference to one other methodological or disciplinary area chosen from: Anthropology, Art History, Comparative Literature, Linguistics, History, Rhetoric, Scandinavian, or another language and literature. Some students may find it advantageous to declare a minor in one of the language departments that offers it.

Major Requirements:

Lower Division. Celtic Studies 70 plus two semester courses from the following course sequences: 15 and 85 or 16 and 86, or the equivalent. Students with prior knowledge of a Celtic language may apply for Credit by Examination.

Upper Division. Upper division courses totaling at least 32 units including either 128 or 129, 138 or 139, and 168 or 169. One class from the following list must be taken: 102A, 102B, 105A, 105B, 144A, 145A, 146A. Also, 8 units must be included from among the following: 118, 119, 125 or 126. Scandinavian 123, 160, and 165 may also count toward the major. Courses from among the following may be taken with the approval of the major advisor: Anthropology 180; Art History 160; Comparative Literature 152 and 165; History 150A, 151A, 151B, 185A; Linguistics 130 or 131.

Minor in Celtic Studies:

Students in the College of Letters and Science may complete one or more minors of their choice, normally in a field both academically and administratively distinct from their major. The minor in Celtic Studies requires:

Lower Division. Celtic Studies 70.

Upper Division. Five upper division courses chosen from the major list and approved by the major adviser. All upper division courses applied to the minor must be completed on a letter-graded basis; at least three of the five courses must be completed at Berkeley, and a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 is required in the upper division courses.

Honors Program:

In order for students to graduate with honors in Celtic Studies, they must have achieved an overall grade-point average of 3.3 or higher in all work completed in the University and a minimum 3.5 grade-point average in all courses required for the major, and they must have taken both Celtic Studies 128 and 129. A thesis is also required, which should normally emanate from H195, the Honors Seminar.

Study Abroad:

Majors: up to three courses (12 units) abroad may be counted towards the major, pending review by the major advisor.
Minors: up to two courses (8 units) abroad may be counted towards the major, pending review by the major advisor.

Graduate Studies:

For advice about graduate studies related to Celtic at UC Berkeley, click here.